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Lesson – Ethical Considerations: Addressing & Preventing Microaggressions in Therapy

Microaggressions are defined as indirect, subtle, or unintentional acts of discrimination against members of minoritized and marginalized groups. The impact of microaggressions can be more detrimental, in some cases, than more overt forms of racism and discrimination we are all familiar with.

Unfortunately, these more subtle microaggressions are an extremely common experience amongst minority individuals today; therefore, to practice ethically, it is essential that mental health clinicians obtain the knowledge, skills and ability to both help clients navigate such experiences and prevent further harm by avoiding inadvertent microaggressions in therapy practice.

“The American Psychological Association (2003) stresses the importance of being aware of oneself as a racial and cultural being, as well as being aware of the cultural worldviews of one’s clients” (Williams, Shamp & Harris, 2017).”  Unfortunately, those in the helping profession often engage in the reinforcement of stereotypes, discrimination and perpetration of microaggressions which tend to run contrary to these professional recommendations (Sue et al., 2007).
In this engaging and interactive live webinar, participants will take a deep dive into defining and exploring examples of microaggressions and the impact of microaggressions on individual well-being.  Through the use of video clips, discussion and reflective activities, participants will be encouraged to explore their own cultural worldview, engage in the practice of cultural humility, and learn strategies to mitigate the perpetration of microaggressions, toward assisting clients in healing from the daily experience of microaggressions.

 

Objectives:

This training will provide participants clinical knowledge and tools to:

a). Define and describe the connection between implicit bias, stereotyping, and microaggressions.

b). Identify at least two examples of how microaggressions show up in the therapeutic relationship.

c). Evaluate and explain the impact microaggressions may have on the receiver of such attacks.

d). Explore and learn to apply strategies to practice cultural humility and mitigate harm in the therapeutic relationship.

e). Learn and practice strategies to work effectively and ethically with clients who have experienced microaggressions.

f). State at least two considerations from your profession’s ethics code that apply to preventing and addressing microaggressions in therapy.

 

Target Audience:

Mental Health Clinicians & Therapists, Social Workers, Psychologists, Marriage & Family Therapists, Counselors, School Personnel, Youth Development Workers; Healthcare Workers

 

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Instructor(s): Crystal Rozelle–Bennett, LMSW

Material Author(s): Crystal Rozelle–Bennett, LMSW

Crystal Rozelle – Bennett, LMSW has been working with youth and families for nearly 20 years. She is committed to empowering, engaging, educating and advocating in order to implement trauma-informed strategies for individuals and communities. Mrs. Bennett earned a Bachelor’s in Arts in Psychology from Wells College and went on to complete her Masters in Social Work from Florida State University. During her career, Ms. Bennett has demonstrated a passion in sharing her personal and professional experiences with others to serve marginalized individuals and prevent re-traumatization. Ms. Bennett is a life longer learner and has provided education and support to foster families, facilitated psychoeducation programs for youth, responded to crisis hotline calls for the Department of Veterans Affairs, and trained behavioral healthcare professionals in the areas of Human Trafficking, Suicide Prevention, Child Trauma/Maltreatment, Motivational Interviewing, Racial Trauma, Cultural Competency and serving LGBT youth.

For additional information about this course, the instructors, or the material authors, please contact Content Assistance at content@onlinececredits.com.

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