Self-Regulation: Strategies & Interventions for Children

Self-Regulation: Strategies & Interventions for Children

This seminar begins with a review of neurobiological processes involved in the development of self-regulation. Further, participants will learn how to communicate knowledge of the brain and its role in self-regulation to parents and children in ways that are more easily grasped and help them to understand the purpose of various interventions. Participants will also learn about the vital role parents/caregivers, clinicians and teachers play in co-regulation. Finally, this seminar includes introduction of over 15 practical, age-appropriate (including play-based) interventions that can be used in therapy sessions or in the classroom to help promote development of self-regulation in children and teens.

 

 

 

Objectives:

a). State the areas of the brain which are involved in processes affecting self-regulation.

b). Name at least 3 possible causes for dysregulation in children and teens and corresponding treatment implications, including the importance of co-regulation.

c). Learn and practice at least 3 strategies to promote self-regulation for infants and toddlers.

d). Learn and practice at least 5 strategies to promote self-regulation in preschool age children.

e). Learn and practice at least 5 strategies to promote self-regulation in elementary age children.

f). Learn and practice at least 3 strategies to promote self-regulation in adolescents and teens.

 

Target Audience:

The target audience for this event includes psychologists, licensed clinical social workers, licensed counselors, MFT’s, and other clinical mental health professionals.

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Instructor(s): Katrina Jones, MS, LCMFT, RPT

Material Author(s): Katrina Jones, MS, LCMFT, RPT

Katrina Jones is a Licensed Clinical Marriage & Family Therapist and Registered Play Therapist. She owns a private practice, Hope for Healing, LLC, in Beloit, Kansas, providing therapy to clients throughout rural North Central Kansas. As a play therapist, Katrina uses self-regulation interventions in her work with young clients almost every day who present with a variety of issues including trauma, anxiety, reactive-attachment and challenges in family systems. She believes strongly in the power of the therapist’s own self-regulation in the therapy room as the basis for this work. In addition to her specialization in play therapy, Katrina is also trained in EMDR. Katrina serves on several steering committee’s and advisory boards in her community, and is currently the secretary for the Kansas Association for Play Therapy Board.

For additional information about this course, the instructors, or the material authors, please contact Content Assistance at content@onlinececredits.com.

Featured Materials :

Course materials for online asynchronous courses are found in the Lesson module after a course is purchased.

Teen Dating Violence

Teen Dating Violence

This course provides an overview of teen dating violence, including dating violence risk factors and protective factors, and recommended treatment approaches.

Objectives:

a). Identify how a teen’s peers may play a role in dating violence.

b). Discuss interventions that may reduce the risk for teen dating violence.

c). Describe how teen dating violence overlaps with bullying, sexual harassment, and other harmful behaviors.

d). Name at least two strategies that can be utilized to use peers as an avenue for preventing dating violence.

Target Audience:

The target audience for this event includes psychologists, licensed clinical social workers, licensed counselors, MFT’s, and other clinical mental health professionals.

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Instructor(s): Jennifer Sweeton, Psy.D, MS, MA

Material Author(s): U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice

For additional information about this course, the instructors, or the material authors, please contact Content Assistance at content@onlinececredits.com. 

Featured Materials :

Teen Dating Violence
Psychosocial Interventions for Anxiety in Kids with Autism

Psychosocial Interventions for Anxiety in Kids with Autism

This course discusses the evidence for the use of psychosocial interventions to manage anxiety in children and adolescents.

Objectives:

a). Describe the efficacy of psychosocial interventions for anxiety in children with autism spectrum disorder.

b). Discuss the interaction between anxiety and autism spectrum disorder symptoms.

c). Name two potential biases present in the reviewed studies.

d). Identify and summarize three different outcome measures described in the course.

Target Audience:

The target audience for this event includes psychologists, licensed clinical social workers, licensed counselors, MFT’s, and other clinical mental health professionals.

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Instructor(s): Jennifer Sweeton, Psy.D, MS, MA

Material Author(s): Ance Kreslins, Ashley E. Robertson, & Craig Melville

For additional information about this course, the instructors, or the material authors, please contact Content Assistance at content@onlinececredits.com. 

Featured Materials :

Psychosocial interventions for anxiety in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder
Neural Mechanisms in Depressed Minors on Antidepressants

Neural Mechanisms in Depressed Minors on Antidepressants

This course discusses the controversial relationship between antidepressants and suicidality in children and adolescents, and outlines three possible neurobiological mechanisms that might account for this adverse effect.

Objectives:

a). Discuss the “black box” warning for antidepressants in children and adolescents.

b). Name at least one psychosocial factor that increases an individual’s suicide risk.

c). Describe what is currently known about the link between serotonin levels and depression symptoms, including suicidal ideation.

d). List the three mechanisms the authors assert might account for SSRIs precipitating suicidal ideation.

Target Audience:

The target audience for this event includes psychologists, licensed clinical social workers, licensed counselors, MFT’s, and other clinical mental health professionals.

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Instructor(s): Jennifer Sweeton, Psy.D, MS, MA

Material Author(s):Julia Morrison & Thomas L. Schwartz

For additional information about this course, the instructors, or the material authors, please contact Content Assistance at content@onlinececredits.com. 

Featured Materials :

adolescent-angst-or-true-intent-suicidal-behavior-risk-and-neurobiological-mechanisms-in-depressed-children-and-teenagers-taking-antidepressants-1522-4821-16-105
Juvenile Sex Offenders – Etiologies and Typologies

Juvenile Sex Offenders – Etiologies and Typologies

This course provides an overview of the etiologies of juvenile sexual offending and the pathways related to the development, onset, and maintenance of sexually abusive behavior, and describes effective treatment approaches for juvenile sexual offenders as well as data on recidivism in this population.

Objectives:

a). Name at least two etiologies of juvenile sexual offending and at least two factors that impact the development, onset, and maintenance of sexually abusive behavior in juveniles.

b). Discuss common patterns of juvenile sex offenses based on each type of offender.

c). Describe effective treatment approaches for juvenile sexual offenders.

d). Summarize recidivism rates for sexually offending juveniles.

Target Audience:

The target audience for this event includes psychologists, licensed clinical social workers, licensed counselors, MFT’s, and other clinical mental health professionals.

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Instructor(s): Jennifer Sweeton, Psy.D, MS, MA

Material Author(s): U.S. Department of Justice Office of Sex Offender Sentencing, Monitoring, Apprehending, Registering, and Tracking

For additional information about this course, the instructors, or the material authors, please contact Content Assistance at content@onlinececredits.com. 

Featured Materials :

Juvenile-Sex-Offenders